What To Remember About Cosmetic Plastic Surgery

Preparing for Your Surgery

Any surgery, including elective plastic and cosmetic surgery, has risks and the potential for complications. If you are healthy to begin with, it will improve your overall experience. Here are tips for you to consider if you are thinking about having a cosmetic or reconstructive procedure.

Mental Preparation And Peace Of Mind Before Plastic Surgery​

Having a good mental attitude, realistic expectations, and patience makes a world of difference both before and after surgery. When you approach your surgery with the proper mindset, the procedure and your recovery go much smoother.​

  • Your mental health needs to be at its best. Patients with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and other mental issues could experience an exacerbation of their symptoms from medications and the stress associated with surgery. Stress and pain can trigger mental issues. Surgery is not recommended during times of high stress, such as divorce, death, and when dealing with other stressful social and psychological issues.
  • Keep a calm perspective. This is elective surgery and you are healthy. We are dealing with skin and tissue movement – this is not open-heart surgery. Millions of people undergo plastic surgery every day with easy recoveries and excellent results. It is not helpful to spend hours online researching potential plastic surgery complications and bad outcomes.
  • Do your homework. Make sure your plastic surgeon is board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery, and view many (not one or two) before-and-after pictures of his or her work so you know your doctor can deliver results you admire. Bargain shopping when it comes to your health and body is not OK in this situation.

Your overall health

Good candidates for cosmetic surgery are women and men who are:

  • physically healthy and at a stable weight
  • interested in improving their physical appearance
  • have realistic expectations
  • non-smokers.

If you are working on losing a substantial amount of weight or planning a pregnancy, consider postponing your cosmetic surgery until you have reached your goals. Significant fluctuations in weight after surgery will diminish your aesthetic improvements. Losing weight before surgery will also reduce your risk of complications.

 

Dietary Considerations When Preparing For Plastic Surgery​

Food and liquid consumption can impact your ability to undergo a safe, effective surgical procedure. When preparing for plastic surgery, be mindful of certain dietary restrictions and considerations, such as:

  • NPO: This means Nothing Per Oral – no water or food, usually after midnight before your surgery. Food or water in your belly risks aspiration from anesthesia. Your surgery will be cancelled if you stop at Starbucks on the way to the surgery center and have a pumpkin spice latte.
  • Meals: Follow a soft diet and avoid heavy meals for a few days preceding the surgery. Have soups and soft mild foods available for after surgery.
  • Hydration: Stay well-hydrated before and after surgery. Electrolyte solutions like Gatorade are best.
  • Caffeine use: If you are regular caffeine or coffee drinker, continue to drink black coffee or soda after surgery. This will decrease symptoms or a headache that can occur from caffeine withdrawal.
  • Medications: Prescribed medications such as blood pressure medicine, heart medication, or Valium can be taken the morning of surgery with saliva in your mouth. It is fine to take your normal migraine or tension headache medicine if approved by Dr. Brown. Again, no aspirin, Motrin, or ibuprofen.

 

Vitamins to take before your plastic surgery

  • There are several vitamins to talk to your surgeon about taking prior to your surgery. Please take a look at the below information:
  • Vitamin A – taken in too large of a dose, this can cause several maladies you’d rather not deal with right now. Be sure to get a recommendation from your surgeon or patient representative for this. Vitamin A is important to the healing process as it plays an important role in collagen production and formation as well as aiding in protection against bacterial and viral infections.
  • Vitamin C – you’ll want to take this prior to your surgery as the surgery itself will deplete your body’s vitamin C stores. Taking it before and after the surgery significantly reduces your healing time. Also, Vitamin C is a is an essential element in collagen production which is important for healing wounds of any type as well as a means to boost your immune system.

 

Do Not:

  • Do not eat or drink anything after midnight prior to the morning of your surgery.
  • Do not wear makeup, lotions or perfume to surgery.
  • Do not wear fingernail polish to surgery.
  • Do not plan to drive yourself to or from the procedure.
  • Do not wear jewelry.
  • Do not bring valuables.

Do:

  • Do wash with an antibacterial soap the night prior to or the morning of your surgery.
  • Do arrive at the surgical facility on time.
  • Do arrange for transportation to and from the procedure.
  • Do wear loose fitting clothes that you do not need to pull over your head in order to put on or take off.
  • Do have a parent or guardian accompany you if you are under the age of 18.
  • Do leave your valuables at home, but bring your ID and method of payment.
  • If you wear artificial fingernails, please do remove the fingernail on the index finger of your right hand so that we may attach the monitoring equipment properly.

 

Why should i stop drinking before my plastic surgery

There are a couple of reasons, one is very obvious but others are less so.

  • Alcohol thins your blood – we all know this. During surgery and the recovery process, it’s important that your blood is as close to normal as possible. The process itself, of course, involves cutting and moving skin, tissue, and sometimes muscle – this all results in bleeding. If your blood is thinner than normal, or thinner than expected, the surgeon may have a harder time stopping unexpected bleeding. For this reason alone, most surgeons will simply refuse to work on a patient who has not followed their instructions in this matter.
  • Alcohol also causes your skin to dry out and this is an obvious problem for plastic surgery as well as the recovery period. Dry skin is harder for the surgeon to work on, harder to staple, harder to stitch and more likely to form visible scars. The recovery process is also compromised as the dry skin just won’t heal as well.
  • There are many other reasons to stop drinking before and after your Plastic Surgery in accordance with your surgeon’s directions – your surgeon will, I’m sure, explain these in detail if you ask.

Tips To Find The Best Veterinarian

Steps to Finding the Perfect Vet

Know your pet’s needs in advance

Before you start visiting veterinary practices and asking questions, make a list of priorities for you and your pet. This will help you ask the right questions as you narrow down your options.

How to start (and narrow down) the search

Once you’ve zeroed in on what you want from a veterinarian, it’s time to actually find a few candidates. Good old fashioned word-of-mouth is the best place to start.

Schedule a tour

Once you’ve found one or two potential vets, plan a facility visit without your dog to get a feel for the place itself. Any reputable veterinary practice will be more than happy to show you around and make you feel welcome.

Ask the right questions

When you visit a veterinarian’s office for the first time, in addition to getting a feel for the facility, you should ask plenty of questions to give you a full picture of their practice. You may write down a few specific questions based on your list of priorities, and you should also ask the following questions.

Once you choose a good vet, be a good client

Establishing a good veterinary routine for your dog depends on finding a vet you trust to provide the best possible care. However, it’s not a one-way street; as your dog’s guardian and advocate, you have a responsibility to support the client-vet relationship. Keep in mind these steps to being a good veterinary clien.

 

How to Find a Good Vet

How to Find a Good Vet: Word of Mouth

Referrals are one way to find a good vet. Referrals from friends and acquaintances are the best way to find a vet. Ask specific questions to those giving referrals: How long has your pet been seeing this vet? What were the health problems and how were they treated? What were the costs?

How to Find a Good Vet: Convenient Location

Another way to find a good vet is the location. After checking your phone book for local addresses, remember that not all vets handle all animal species. And to call himself a specialist, your vet must have additional training in an area of expertise such as ophthalmology, and be approved by the licensing body in his province. Vets aren’t allowed to use advertising that implies superiority, such as “best in town.” If you have any questions, call your provincial veterinary medical association.

How to Find a Good Vet: Make a Short List and Visit Clinics

One way to find a good vet is to visit clinics. Arrive early, sit in the waiting room and chat with other clients. Look for a well-organized office with a cheerful receptionist. Your pet might wind up having more contact with the support staff than with the veterinarian, so everyone you meet should inspire confidence. Animal health technologists or veterinary technicians have a college diploma allowing them to work under the supervision of a veterinarian and to carry out almost all types of animal care except diagnosing, prescribing drugs or performing surgery.

How to Find a Good Vet: Services & Treatment Areas

One way to find a good vet is to be sure of the type of service you need. Do you prefer a small clinic with one or two veterinarians, or large premises with specialists and diagnostic tools like ultrasound and endoscopy equipment? Is round-the-clock nursing available if your pet has to stay overnight? Would you prefer a practice that specializes in your type of pet; an all-cat practice, for example?

How to Find a Good Vet: Emergency

When looking for a good vet, make sure you know what type of service you will receive in emergency situations. Some vets still make house calls and offer emergency services after regular hours. Increasingly, especially in urban areas, you’ll be directed to a 24-hour emergency hospital. When your pet is struck by a vehicle, accidentally poisoned or suddenly immobilized, minutes could save its life.

 

How to Choose a Veterinarian

Ask for Referrals

Your friends probably aren’t vet-evaluating experts any more than you are, but they can tell you whether the vet or the techs in an office manhandle the animals or coax them into cooperating, whether the office returns calls promptly, and how good the vet is at explaining health issues.

Check Qualifications and Expertise

DVMs and VMDs are the general practitioners of the veterinary world. But you’ll find many who treat only “small animals” (a label that stretches to include your 130-pound Mastiff). Also, some vets work mainly with dogs, or cats, or “exotics.” A species-limited vet can be a big plus. Doctors for humans work with just one species, of course, and can usually use words to communicate with their patients. A general practice vet, on the other hand, has to cultivate knowledge about several species, and not one of his patients can say to him, “Doc, it’s a chronic burning pain and it started last Tuesday.” So it can be a big plus if your vet limits her practice to a few species, or just one.

Get a Tour

Call in advance, explain that you’re a prospective client, and set a convenient appointment – you don’t want to show up in the middle of an emergency, or at a just plain busy time. The whole clinic should be clean, of course. Do cut them some slack if a sick animal just vomited, urinated, or defecated, but overall the place shouldn’t reek. On your tour, keep a sharp eye out for the surgery room or suite. It should be squeaky clean, not used for storage or as a hangout for the office cat. If there’s a surgery taking place, you won’t be going in, but take the opportunity to make sure the office practices good sterile technique. Look for a full gown, mask, and gloves, not just a scrub top.

 

How to Choose a Veterinarian

Don’t Wait

The worst time to look for a vet is when you really need one. Even before you get a pet, a veterinarian can help you decide which type is best for your family’s needs and lifestyle.

Ask Around

Do you have a friend who loves her pet as much as you do? Find out where she takes him. A personal reference can be more reliable than review sites, especially if the pet owner’s standards are similar to your own.

Check Credentials

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) accredits clinics that show that they have the highest standards of care. You can visit its website to find an accredited facility near you.

Schedule a Visit

Once you’ve found a practice you like, request a meeting with a veterinarian there to discuss any questions you have. Write them down before you go. A few things to consider:

 

Finding the Right Vet for Your Pet

When Should I Look for a Vet?

Guardians seek out new vets for a variety of reasons, including a recent adoption or move, concerns about a current vet’s quality of care or treatment for a pet’s specific health problem.

How Do I Look for a Vet?

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) evaluates veterinary practices on the quality of their facilities, staff, equipment and patient care. Search the organization’s website at www.aahanet.org for a list of accredited vets in your area.

How Do I Decide Which Vet Is right for My Dog?

Here are some things to consider when selecting a vet:

What Questions Should I Ask When I’m Selecting a Vet?

Although your questions may vary depending on the reason for your visit, you can use the following list as a guide:

What If I Have Problems with My Vet? Can I Switch?

Don’t worry about leaving your current vet if you have concerns about the quality of care. Most veterinary practices, like all businesses, expect clients to come and go. Before you leave, remember to ask for a complete copy of your dog’s health records to be mailed or faxed to you or your new vet.